We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

Do Children Grow at Different Rates during the Year?

Though it's relatively well-known that children don't grow at a steady rate throughout childhood — puberty being one well-known major growth spurt — it's not relatively well-known that the seasons — winter, fall, summer, and spring — seem to have an impact on a child's growth rate. Many children grow more quickly in the spring and summer, and then maintain a relatively steady height throughout autumn and winter. This seasonal increase in growth is thought to perhaps be the result of increased exposure to sunlight during spring and summer months, but other contributing factors may include genetics, home environment, and nutrition.

More about growth spurts:

  • Puberty — which generally begins in girls between 8 and 13 years old, and boys between ages 10-15 — often ushers one of the most major of growth spurts in children.
  • A child may grow an average of three times more quickly during a spring growth spurt in comparison to the steady rate throughout the rest of the year.
  • Increases in height and weight do not necessarily occur during the same seasonal growth spurts. Weight gain has been found to be more common in the autumn and winter, while height tends to stay level.
Allison Boelcke
By Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By anon992185 — On Aug 20, 2015

You get Vitamin D from the sun, and Vitamin D is important for bone growth.

By Soha — On Jun 10, 2014

How can the sunlight and exposure affect the rate of growth of children in summer and spring? Can someone please give me an appropriate answer? It's confusing me a lot!

By anon320454 — On Feb 18, 2013

As plants and everything, also grow faster in spring, so the children do, which also are like plants.

Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.