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How do I get Rid of Chickenpox Scars?

Diane Goettel
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
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There are a number of over-the-counter creams and skin care products that can be used to help fade or reduce the appearance of chickenpox scars, but it may be necessary to work with a dermatologist or even plastic surgeon in order to deal with deep chickenpox scars. Some of the most common products that are used to fade scars and treat damaged skin are cocoa butter and vitamin E. There are also products that are meant to fade discoloration in the skin that may be the result of chickenpox. These skin care products are often formulated with vitamin C and marshmallow extract.

When treating chickenpox scars at home, it is best to start by cleansing the skin so that the skin care products can sink as deeply as possible into the skin without interacting with any dirt or oil that may have collected on the skin. Then rub the product into the skin using as much as the product label indicates. Massaging the area a bit while rubbing the cream or lotion into the skin will help to boost circulation in the skin, which helps with the healing process and may also help to break up scar tissue in the skin. This process can usually be done in the morning and at night. There are some creams for the face that are specifically indicated for night use.

Another kind of treatment that can be done at home is exfoliation. Sloughing away dead skin cells helps to replenish the skin and can reduce the appearance and depth of scars. Depending on one's skin sensitivity, the skin can be exfoliated anywhere from once a week to once a day. There are also exfoliating masks that may help to reduce the appearance of chickenpox scars. It is important to remember that chickenpox scars should not be treated until the skin has entirely healed and only scars remain. Broken or irritated skin should only be treated according to the doctor's orders.

If over-the-counter products are not sufficient, then it may be time to discuss treatments such as laser resurfacing or perhaps chemical peels. For very serious scarring, the dermatologist may make a referral to a plastic surgeon. A slightly less severe treatment that can be performed at a spa instead of at a doctor's office or in a surgical setting is microdermabrasion. This is an intense form of exfoliation that is done in installments and can yield a number of beneficial results, such as making the skin appear younger, fighting acne, and reducing the appearance of scars.

TheHealthBoard is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Diane Goettel
By Diane Goettel
In addition to her work as a freelance writer for TheHealthBoard, Diane Goettel serves as the executive editor of Black Lawrence Press, an independent publishing company based in upstate New York. Over the course, she has edited several anthologies, the e-newsletter “Sapling,” and The Adirondack Review. Diane holds a B.A. from Sarah Lawrence College and an M.A. from Brooklyn College.

Discussion Comments

By amypollick — On May 31, 2013

@anon336733: Try vitamin E oil. It's not an overnight cure, but it you apply a few drops morning and evening, it will help fade the scars.

I had terrible chicken pox when I was six years old, and have four scars on my face, but they have faded with time. Yours will, too.

By anon336733 — On May 31, 2013

It's been two years since I had chicken pox and the scars still remain. I have tried so many household tips to remove them but it didn't worked out so can anybody help me because I am so tried of hearing others making fun of me.

Jefin from India.

Diane Goettel

Diane Goettel

In addition to her work as a freelance writer for TheHealthBoard, Diane Goettel serves as the executive editor of Black...
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