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How Do I Remove Calcium Deposits on Teeth?

A. Pasbjerg
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
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Calcium deposits on teeth can appear as unsightly white spots, and there are several options you can use to try to remove them and improve the appearance of your teeth. Regular brushing and good dental hygiene can help prevent calcium deposits from developing in the first place; once they do occur, use of a toothpaste containing baking soda and peroxide, plus brushing with a motorized toothbrush, may help clear them up. If home treatment does not work, you may need to seek a dentist's assistance to remove calcium deposits from teeth using techniques like fluoride treatments or air abrasion. Deposits that are too deep may not be removable, in which case other techniques can be used to hide them and improve the appearance of your teeth.

The development of calcium deposits on teeth may be avoided by consistently brushing and flossing and seeing your dentist, but once they are there those techniques will likely not be enough to remove them. You can try to take care of them yourself, however, by using toothpaste containing peroxide and baking soda, which can help loosen the deposit if it is not too significant. Using a stronger toothbrush with a motor may also be enough to take minor deposits off of your teeth.

If you find that you are unable to remove the calcium deposits on teeth yourself, a dentist may be able to assist in taking off the spots on your teeth. For people who get deposits due to mineral insufficiency, fluoride treatments can help clear calcium deposits. Another possible option is air abrasion, where small crystal particles are blown out of a machine and over the affected parts of your teeth, abrading away the deposits.

In some cases, calcium deposits on teeth can be too extensive to be removed, and you may need to explore alternative options with your dentist to improve the appearance of your teeth. Whitening your teeth can actually make the problem worse, but your dentist can apply a white filling called bonding to the spots on your teeth so they are no longer visible. Another option is having porcelain veneers or crowns put over your teeth to permanently hide the discoloration, particularly if bonding does not do so effectively or if spots reappear after having that procedure. This can be expensive, however, so it may not be a viable solution for everyone.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
A. Pasbjerg
By A. Pasbjerg
Andrea Pasbjerg, a The Health Board contributor, holds an MBA from West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Her business background helps her to create content that is both informative and practical, providing readers with valuable insights and strategies for success in the business world.
Discussion Comments
By ZipLine — On Oct 23, 2013

I've never had calcium deposits on my teeth. I brush twice a day (sometimes thrice) and get a dental cleaning every six months. I think prevention is the best.

By fBoyle — On Oct 23, 2013

@literally45-- You can get an etching treatment. That's what I did and it worked for me.

The dentist etches your teeth with an acid, so he basically corrodes the teeth enamel a little bit and then applies a paste. The paste basically recolors your teeth to make the spots disappear. It's super easy and pain free. You might need a few sessions over a period of several weeks but it's worth it.

Ask your dentist about this procedure. If he's not familiar with it, go to a different dentist.

By literally45 — On Oct 22, 2013

I have calcium deposits on my tooth enamel that my dentist can't scrape off. He suggested veneers but I don't think I want to go in that route. My teeth are actually very good, straight and I don't have anything aside from a few fillings.

Is there am easier, less expensive and less invasive dental procedure that can get rid of calcium deposits?

A. Pasbjerg
A. Pasbjerg
Andrea Pasbjerg, a The Health Board contributor, holds an MBA from West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Her business background helps her to create content that is both informative and practical, providing readers with valuable insights and strategies for success in the business world.
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