We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

How Do I Use Manuka Honey for Wounds?

A. Pasbjerg
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
Our promise to you
The Health Board is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At The Health Board, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

If you have a wound such as a cut, burn, or abscess, you may want to try manuka honey to help it heal. Make sure to use plenty of honey so that the wound is completely covered and also fills any deep cuts or ulcers, particularly if there is a large amount of drainage. When using manuka honey for wounds, keep a clean dressing such as a bandage or pad over the area, preferably one that is waterproof so the honey is not absorbed by the bandage. The area should be kept clean, and sterile instruments should always be used to apply the honey before a sterile dressing is placed over it.

When using manuka honey for wounds, you need to use a sufficient amount of it for healing. Manuka honey promotes healing because it destroys bacteria with its acidity and ability to absorb fluid within the wound. In order to do this, it needs to cover the entire wound, and also get inside of deep wounds so it covers all of the open area to the bottom. You may need to apply it more thickly and frequently if the wound is seeping heavily, as more will be needed to absorb all of the fluid. As you heal and the wound exudes less fluid, you should have to apply less honey, less frequently.

In order to keep the honey in contact with your wound, you will likely want to cover it with a dressing of some type. You may even want to apply honey to the dressing and then press it to the wound, or buy dressings infused with honey; this can be less messy and also help you prevent additional damage to the wound. Use a pad or bandage large enough to cover the whole injured and infected area to keep the honey in contact everywhere it is needed. It is best when using manuka honey for wounds to keep as much of it directly against the injuries as possible, so a waterproof bandage that will not absorb the honey and draw it away is usually best.

Cleanliness is critical both before and while using manuka honey for wounds. Before you apply the dressing, make sure the wound is thoroughly cleaned. In the case of burns, run cool water over the area first as well. Use a sterile spatula or other instrument to apply the honey generously to the wound, then cover it with a sterile pad or bandage. Follow the same procedure each time you change the dressing, and always make sure your hands are washed first.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
A. Pasbjerg
By A. Pasbjerg
Andrea Pasbjerg, a The Health Board contributor, holds an MBA from West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Her business background helps her to create content that is both informative and practical, providing readers with valuable insights and strategies for success in the business world.
Discussion Comments
By anon1003474 — On Jul 01, 2020

It's a higher content of honey that most others.

By Lostnfound — On Sep 16, 2014

@Grivusangel -- I'm sure the expense comes in part from transportation costs. The honey is usually imported from New Zealand, so that explains the price, at least in part.

As I understand it, the only place the manuka plant grows is in New Zealand, so manuka honey is only made in one place, which also contributes to the cost.

I don't know if regular honey would help with wound care or not. You might ask the proprietor of the health food store. He or she might know. A doctor who is open to alternative medicine might also know whether any kind of honey is good for wounds.

By Grivusangel — On Sep 15, 2014

I saw this in a health food store and it was something like $40 for about 17 ounces! Why on earth is it so expensive? Will local honey not do as well for wounds -- to say nothing of costing a third of the price?

Is regular honey acidic enough to help wounds heal, or is it just manuka honey? What makes it so special? I couldn't believe it when I saw that stuff was $40! That's a tank of gas, and then some, for my car. That stuff had better have gold flakes in it to be worth that kind of money. I just can't understand why it's so pricey. Does anyone have any idea?

A. Pasbjerg
A. Pasbjerg
Andrea Pasbjerg, a The Health Board contributor, holds an MBA from West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Her business background helps her to create content that is both informative and practical, providing readers with valuable insights and strategies for success in the business world.
The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.