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What are the Different Kinds of Walker Parts?

Alex Tree
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
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A walker is a tool that is used to improve the mobility of the disabled and elderly. It primarily consists of a frame that surrounds the person’s front and sides. Many walkers also have wheels, enabling the user to simply push it rather than pick it up. Occasionally, the walker will have a padded seat for the user to rest on. Other optional walker parts are less popular but still have widespread use.

The frame of the walker normally has two legs on each side. Often, the walker legs can be adjusted to better suit the height of the user. Every walker frame has a maximum weight limit, depending on the strength of its legs and connecting bars. Special frames are built for overweight and obese people.

A walker seat is usually a permanent fixture on the walker, but a few walkers have detachable ones. The seat is small and designed to allow the user to walk without being hindered by it. Like other walker parts, the seat usually has a weight limit.

While some walkers come with wheels, wheels are not suited for everyone. For example, if a disabled person must lean heavily on the walker, a wheel-less walker is a better choice for stability. These walker parts have their advantages, however, especially when the user doesn’t heavily rely on the device but cannot or does not wish to pick it up with every step. For those who cannot decide between wheeled or wheel-less mobility aids, some walkers come with detachable wheels.

In addition to the essential parts, walker accessories are also available. For example, walker balls are round balls usually made from rubber that fit onto the ends of walker legs. Their primary uses are to quiet the user’s movement throughout their home and allow the walker to glide more easily across wood, tile, or low-pile carpet floors. Walker balls come in many designs and colors. Some budget-minded people opt to cut a hole in a tennis ball and use it instead of purchasing an item specifically designed for their walker.

A walker basket is another popular accessory, especially for the user who does his or her own shopping. This item is also frequently used to carry items around the house. A walker basket can come with the purchase of the walker or be purchased and installed at a later date. These walker parts come in varying sizes, with some specifically designed for use during shopping trips.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Alex Tree
By Alex Tree
Andrew McDowell is a talented writer and The Health Board contributor. His unique perspective and ability to communicate complex ideas in an accessible manner make him a valuable asset to the team, as he crafts content that both informs and engages readers.
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Alex Tree
Alex Tree
Andrew McDowell is a talented writer and The Health Board contributor. His unique perspective and ability to communicate complex ideas in an accessible manner make him a valuable asset to the team, as he crafts content that both informs and engages readers.
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