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What Are the Effects of Catnip on Humans?

Marjorie McAtee
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
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The effects of catnip on humans have not been widely documented by modern medical science, but both European and American folk traditions have assigned this herb several healing properties. One of the main effects of catnip on humans is said to be a sedative effect. Traditional folk medicine typically maintains that a small dose of catnip infused in a tea or ingested as a dietary supplement can soothe insomnia. The herb has also been traditionally used to treat cold, flu, asthma, bronchitis, and other respiratory ailments, and is said to relieve stomachache and other digestive complaints. Both modern physicians and traditional healers recommend that this herb not be administered to pregnant women, as it could contribute to loss of the fetus.

While some say that smoking the herb catnip can lead to feelings of euphoria in humans, most doctors don't believe that this is true. It is believed, however, that the sedative effects of catnip on humans can help to ease frayed nerves and anxiety in small dosages, or induce sleep in larger doses. Doctors and herbalists think that the herb catnip contains a compound known as nepetalactone, which may be responsible for the relaxing and sedative effects of catnip on humans.

In 18th-century Ireland, the herb catnip was often administered to ease respiratory congestion and enhance ease of breathing. The Irish also used this herb as a treatment for delayed onset of menarche, or first menstruation, and as a diuretic to stimulate the passage of urine. Some historical documentation indicates that the herb was administered as a means of inducing abortion in centuries past. Modern medical science has documented the herbs abortifacient properties, and most doctors believe that the herb can lead to uterine contractions and miscarriage in pregnant women.

In traditional Appalachian culture, the herb catnip was often administered as a treatment for stomach upset. It is believed to be a very effective remedy for the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. It may help to ease digestion and intestinal cramps. It has been used to relieve diarrhea, and is also seen as an effective remedy for painful intestinal gas.

The additional effects of catnip on humans may be somewhat analgesic. Many believe that the herb can be chewed to relieve the pain of toothache. It has also been administered as a headache remedy.

Catnip is also believed to help stop bleeding and contribute to the healing of wounds, and can be topically applied for that purpose. Most medicinal preparations make use of the leaves and flowers of the plant, but some herbalists believe that the plant's roots can cause irritability.

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Marjorie McAtee
By Marjorie McAtee , Former Writer
Marjorie McAtee, a talented writer and editor with over 15 years of experience, brings her diverse background and education to everything she writes. With degrees in relevant fields, she crafts compelling content that informs, engages, and inspires readers across various platforms. Her ability to understand and connect with audiences makes her a skilled member of any content creation team.

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Discussion Comments

By fify — On Nov 21, 2013

I know someone who smokes catnip to get a high. He says that catnip gives him hallucinations. I think it's nonsense. Catnip is euphoric for cats, not people.

By SarahGen — On Nov 20, 2013

@ddljohn-- Give catnip a try, but keep in mind that there really isn't sufficient evidence out there about its effects in humans.

I took catnip supplements for a while for migraines and it gave me upset stomach. Upset stomach is supposed to be one of the things that catnip treats. I don't believe that the effects of catnip on humans is consistent and entirely reliable for this reason. You might benefit from it, but if you notice any side effects, stop taking it.

By ddljohn — On Nov 20, 2013

My German friend told me that catnip tea is a common home treatment for colds and upset stomach, at least in their family. Apparently, even some European doctors recommend catnip tea to their patients for various ailments.

Catnip tea is not well known in the US though. We all give it to our cats to play with, but we don't take advantage of its benefits.

I plan on buying some catnip tea this week. I have been having trouble falling asleep. Maybe catnip tea will help.

Marjorie McAtee

Marjorie McAtee

Former Writer

Marjorie McAtee, a talented writer and editor with over 15 years of experience, brings her diverse background and education to everything she writes. With degrees in relevant fields, she crafts compelling content that informs, engages, and inspires readers across various platforms. Her ability to understand and connect with audiences makes her a skilled member of any content creation team.
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