We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What are the Most Common Causes of Skin Lesions?

Allison Boelcke
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
Our promise to you
The Health Board is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At The Health Board, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Skin lesions is a broad term that refers to any areas of skin that change in appearance from the rest of the skin. This can include a wide range of skin conditions, such as wounds, sores, rashes, scabs, or discolorations. The causes of skin lesions can range from benign and mild to life-threatening.

One of the most common causes of skin lesions is acne. Acne is a condition in which the pores on the skin become clogged with excess oil, dead skin, or bacteria, and cause lesions to form on the skin. These lesions can range from small red spots, yellow pus-filled bumps, or cystic acne, which causes deep and painful pits in the surface of the skin. Acne can occur anywhere on the skin’s surface, but tends to be most common on the face, neck, back, shoulders, and chest.

Psoriasis is another common skin condition that can also result in skin lesions. Normally during the life cycle of skin cells, old dead skin cells regularly flake off and are replaced with new skin cells. Psoriasis causes these dead skin cells to stay in place and accumulate instead of flaking off, resulting in thick stacked patches of hard dead skin. These patches of dead skin are often referred to as scales and may be elevated rather than be flat lesions.

Various infections can be different causes of skin lesions. These lesions include bacterial infections that occur in the hair follicles on the skin, known as folliculitis, or on other areas on the skin that come into contact with bacteria. Other infections that can lead to skin lesions include herpes, a viral infection that can cause painful blisters, or acute allergic contact dermatitis, a condition that causes a red rash and occurs when the skin is exposed to a chemical or other substance to which a person is allergic.

Some of the more serious causes of skin lesions include autoimmune disorders. An autoimmune disorder refers to any disorder that occurs when the body’s immune system begins to destroy health cells in the same manner it uses to fight off bacteria, diseases, viruses, and other foreign substances. An example of an autoimmune disorder is pemphigus, a rare condition that causes blisters to inexplicably form on the skin, lining of the mouth, and genitals. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is an autoimmune disorder caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that eventually destroys the body’s immune system and can also cause dark purple lesions on the skin.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Allison Boelcke
By Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By SteamLouis — On Jun 10, 2013

@fBoyle-- STDs come to mind first, but it could also be something like psoriasis.

My husband has psoriasis and develops skin lesions sometimes. He even had one on his penis once. So don't jump to conclusions, just make sure to see a doctor soon.

The only time I had a skin lesion was when I had a staph infection in college. I think I got it from the girls' locker room. At one point, I literally had a hole in my leg. It was terrible.

By discographer — On Jun 10, 2013

@fBoyle-- There are so many possible causes.

It could be due to a sexually transmitted disease like chlamydia or herpes. It could be a skin disease caused by fungi or an allergic reaction. A doctor has to see it and a swab has to be taken to check for viruses, fungi or bacteria.

If you think that it could be STD related, avoid sexual contact and physical contact until it's fully treated.

By fBoyle — On Jun 09, 2013

What causes lesions on the penis?

Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.