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What is an Eosinophil?

An eosinophil is a type of white blood cell, crucial in your body's immune response, especially in fighting off parasitic infections and in allergic reactions. These cells, identifiable by their distinctive red-orange granules under a microscope, play a complex role in maintaining health. Intrigued by how these tiny defenders protect you? Discover their fascinating functions in our immune system's arsenal.
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

An eosinophil is a type of white blood cell involved in immune system responses. These cells also appear to play a role in allergies and asthma when the body produces too many of them and they overreact to a perceived problem in the body, because they release substances which can be toxic. Like other types of blood cells, these cells can be counted when blood is drawn and separated, and an eosinophil count may be ordered to help a doctor understand what is causing a medical problem.

The eosinophil cell is named for a type of acidic dye. The ability to thrive in acidic environments is important for an eosinophil, as it allows the cell to reach many areas of the body. Eosinophils may also be referred to as acidophiles in some regions of the world, reflecting their acid-loving nature, although this terminology is not usual.

Eosinophil plays a role in allergies.
Eosinophil plays a role in allergies.

Normally, eosinophils make up around one to six percent of the white blood cells in the body. They are produced in the bone marrow, and they are part of a group of white blood cells known as granulocytes, because they are filled with small granules of material which they can release at the site of an infection or inflammatory reaction. Essentially, granulocytes are like mobile responders with their own tool kits which they can utilize to address an emerging medical problem quickly.

Eosinophil may be counted when blood is drawn to help determine the nature of a medical problem.
Eosinophil may be counted when blood is drawn to help determine the nature of a medical problem.

When an antigen is introduced to the human body, eosinophils are among the cells which arrive at the site to contain and neutralize the problem. An eosinophil can respond to bacterial, parasitic, and viral infections anywhere in the body, and the cells can also deal with ongoing inflammatory processes such as those caused by underlying infections or excessive immune responses. Typically, concentrations of these cells in the blood increase when someone is battling infection.

Eosinpenia can be the result of Cushing's Syndrome.
Eosinpenia can be the result of Cushing's Syndrome.

In a condition known as eosinophilia, there are too many of these cells in the blood. This can be a big problem, because when the cells degranulate, the compounds they carry can cause damage in high concentrations. When eosinophils flock to an area like the gut to respond to an infection and then flood the area with various compounds, they can cause irritation, inflammation, and other problems. In allergic responses, eosinophils overreact to an allergen, causing problems like skin irritation and difficulty breathing. Eosinpenia, in which there are too few, can be the result of steroid use or Cushing's Syndrome.

Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a TheHealthBoard researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Learn more...
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a TheHealthBoard researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Learn more...

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Discussion Comments

JaneAir

@ceilingcat - Allergies are no fun. Have you considered allergy shots? They are fairly safe and highly effective for reducing the immune response that causes allergies. Allergy shots don't work directly on the eosinophils but they do seem to reduce eosinophil activation.

ceilingcat

It's so interesting to know the specific blood cell responsible for allergies. I knew allergies were the result of some kind of immune reaction but I didn't know there was a specific blood cell responsible for it.

I wonder if scientists can find some way to treat allergies by doing something to the eosinophil antibodies. I get tired of taking my allergy medicine every day!

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    • Eosinophil plays a role in allergies.
      By: Picture Partners
      Eosinophil plays a role in allergies.
    • Eosinophil may be counted when blood is drawn to help determine the nature of a medical problem.
      By: TRITOOTH
      Eosinophil may be counted when blood is drawn to help determine the nature of a medical problem.
    • Eosinpenia can be the result of Cushing's Syndrome.
      By: joshya
      Eosinpenia can be the result of Cushing's Syndrome.