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What is Anti-Streptolysin O?

Marjorie McAtee
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
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Anti-streptolysin O (ASO) is an antibody often found in the blood of people who have suffered a streptococcus infection. A blood test, known as the anti-streptolysin O titre, is sometimes used to test for the presence of this antibody in the blood. This test is considered useful because certain health conditions, such as rheumatic fever, usually only occur in people who have recently suffered or are suffering a streptococcus infection. While testing for anti-streptolysin O is not considered effective for diagnosing a specific illness, it can help doctors determine if a patient is suffering from a streptococci-related disease.

People who have had a streptococcus infection in the last few months may still have the antibody anti-streptolysin O in their blood. People who have an active streptococcus infection may also have the antibody in their blood. Common streptococcus infections can include strep throat, rheumatic fever, scarlet fever, and bacterial endocarditis.

Streptococcus infections can cause serious complications, including inflammation of the membrane surrounding the heart. Streptococci bacteria can also cause serious infections of the kidneys. Rheumatic fever and scarlet fever are considered serious forms of streptococcus infection.

Testing for these antibodies with an anti-streptolysin O titre can help doctors diagnose a patient's symptoms. If the test indicates that streptococcus infection has occurred, then doctors may be better able to diagnose scarlet fever, rheumatic fever, or infection of the heart or kidneys. Some conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, can cause symptoms similar to those of a streptococcus infection, but they do not usually occur as a result of this infection.

Levels of anti-streptolysin O antibodies in the blood are measured by taking a small blood sample, usually from a vein in the hand or arm. Normal blood levels of anti-streptolysin O are usually no higher than 160 units per milliliter of blood. When a person has high levels of ASO, doctors may consider the possibility of an ongoing streptococcus infection. High levels of ASO in the blood don't necessarily mean that the infection is still present, however. They could mean that the person recently suffered from a streptococcus infection, but has recovered within the past few months.

If high levels of ASO are found in the blood and symptoms of continuing illness are present, further diagnostic tests may be needed. Physicians typically tailor the treatment for streptococcus infection according to the patient's specific illness and individual needs.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Marjorie McAtee
By Marjorie McAtee , Former Writer
Marjorie McAtee, a talented writer and editor with over 15 years of experience, brings her diverse background and education to everything she writes. With degrees in relevant fields, she crafts compelling content that informs, engages, and inspires readers across various platforms. Her ability to understand and connect with audiences makes her a skilled member of any content creation team.

Discussion Comments

By starrynight — On Jul 28, 2011

@JaneAir - That is very sad about that man's wife. Doctors make mistakes though, and sometimes rapid strep tests don't show strep even when it is there.

I actually had no idea that scarlet fever was causes by streptococcus. I thought scarlet fever wasn't very common anymore, but it actually is still fairly common.

Last year one of my co-worker's daughters caught scarlet fever. It was going around at her daycare! My co-worker's daughter ended up all right, but she was extremely sick there for a few days.

By JaneAir — On Jul 27, 2011

I've had strep throat a ton of times, but I've never had to have a blood test for anti-streptolysin O. That's probably a good thing.

Like the article says, strep is serious. Life threatening, even. In fact, at one of the bars I used to work at I knew a customer whose wife had passed away from strep. It had infected her heart and she passed away in a matter of days.

However, in her case, the doctor had misdiagnosed her with just having a cold and didn't give her antibiotics. I always felt really bad for our customer, because he told me once he thought he would still have his wife with him if the doctor had diagnosed her properly.

By anon161609 — On Mar 20, 2011

please give the mechanism of action of ASO and their cross reaction with the self cells.

Marjorie McAtee

Marjorie McAtee

Former Writer

Marjorie McAtee, a talented writer and editor with over 15 years of experience, brings her diverse background and education to everything she writes. With degrees in relevant fields, she crafts compelling content that informs, engages, and inspires readers across various platforms. Her ability to understand and connect with audiences makes her a skilled member of any content creation team.
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