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What is Bladder Ultrasound?

A bladder ultrasound is a non-invasive imaging test that uses sound waves to visualize the bladder and its contents, helping doctors diagnose issues such as infections, stones, or tumors. With real-time pictures, it offers a clear view without radiation exposure. Curious about how this technology might impact your health? Discover the intricacies and benefits of bladder ultrasound in our comprehensive guide.
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

A bladder ultrasound is an ultrasound imaging study in which the goal is to get a clear image of the bladder for the purpose of evaluating bladder health. In addition to acquiring images of the bladder, the study may also include imaging of the kidneys, since these organs are closely related. This painless and noninvasive medical test can sometimes provide a great deal of useful information which will help a doctor arrive at a diagnosis and treatment plan.

In ultrasound imaging, high frequency sound waves are projected into the body and recorded upon their return. The changes in the sound waves are used to create a map of the inside of the body. Classically, ultrasound is performed with a hand held transducer which can send and receive information, and the image is displayed on a screen with the use of a computer program which interprets the data from the ultrasound transducer.

A cutaway of a female body showing the bladder in dark pink.
A cutaway of a female body showing the bladder in dark pink.

When a bladder ultrasound is requested, the ultrasound technician or doctor will apply a thin layer of conductive gel to the lower belly, and manipulate a transducer in the area until the bladder becomes visible on the screen. At this point, the angle and location of the transducer can be adjusted to image as much of the bladder as possible, along with the kidneys, if desired. The resulting images can be studied by the doctor.

A bladder ultrasound attempts to get an image of the bladder to evaluate bladder issues.
A bladder ultrasound attempts to get an image of the bladder to evaluate bladder issues.

In some cases, a bladder ultrasound may be requested because someone is having problems with his or her bladder. The ultrasound can reveal the presence of an obstruction, such as a tumor or kidney stones, and it can also reveal signs of inflammation and other problems. The ultrasound may also be used to determine bladder volume, or to check on a patient's post-surgical recovery, and to look for congenital defects in the bladder, kidneys, and urinary tract which might be responsible for a patient's health problems.

An ultrasound can reveal the presence of kidney stones.
An ultrasound can reveal the presence of kidney stones.

During the bladder ultrasound, the person administering the test may point out anatomical structures of interest, if requested to do so. If he or she is a doctor, live interpretation about the image may also be offered, such as identification of a tumor, or a report that the ultrasound looks clear. Ultrasound technicians are not permitted to provide diagnostic information and medical advice to patients, although they will note findings when writing up a report for a doctor. If the ultrasound technician has a strange expression or a look of concern during a bladder ultrasound, this is not necessarily a cause for panic, and patients should try not to pester the technician with questions he or she may not be legally allowed to answer.

Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a TheHealthBoard researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Learn more...
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a TheHealthBoard researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Learn more...

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    • A cutaway of a female body showing the bladder in dark pink.
      By: kocakayaali
      A cutaway of a female body showing the bladder in dark pink.
    • A bladder ultrasound attempts to get an image of the bladder to evaluate bladder issues.
      By: Andrey Chmelyov
      A bladder ultrasound attempts to get an image of the bladder to evaluate bladder issues.
    • An ultrasound can reveal the presence of kidney stones.
      By: airborne77
      An ultrasound can reveal the presence of kidney stones.
    • An ultrasound can create a map of the inside of the body to view the bladder and other organs.
      By: Klaus Eppele
      An ultrasound can create a map of the inside of the body to view the bladder and other organs.
    • Ultrasound gel is used to lubricate the transducer in preparation for a bladder ultrasound to ensure a clear image is displayed.
      By: Klaus Eppele
      Ultrasound gel is used to lubricate the transducer in preparation for a bladder ultrasound to ensure a clear image is displayed.