We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What Is Silent Meditation?

M.C. Huguelet
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
Our promise to you
The Health Board is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At The Health Board, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Rather than being a specific discipline or form of meditation, silent meditation is merely a technique in which one remains silent during his meditation practice. Some individuals opt to meditate silently simply because they find sounds such as mantras or music to be distracting, while others feel that silent meditation allows them to access a deeper meditative plane. During silent meditation, it is common practice to focus on the cycle of one’s breath. The concept of silent meditation gained popularity in Western countries such as the US in the late 20th century, leading to the foundation of a number of silent retreat centers.

Silent meditation is a technique which can be applied to many different forms of meditation. As its name suggests, the technique simply involves remaining silent during one’s meditation practice. This silence may be observed during individual or group meditations, and can last anywhere from a few moments to several days or even weeks, depending largely on the objectives and experience level of the meditating individual.

Some individuals opt to meditate silently simply because they find the sounds common to some types of meditation, such as mantras or ambient music, to be distracting. Others may wish to perform a meditation in a public or semi-public place, such as an office, in which noise would be bothersome to others. Still others feel that silent meditation allows them to access a deeper meditative plane.

During silent meditation, it is common practice to focus on the cycle of one’s breath. In the absence of background noise, it becomes possible to hear the breath as it is drawn in and then released from the body. The breath can thus become a focal point, allowing meditating individuals to temporarily banish everyday thoughts and worries from their awareness and simply “be.” To facilitate concentration on the breath’s passage and build up one’s meditative discipline, some meditation experts recommend counting one’s breaths in cycles of 21, beginning with one cycle and eventually building up to several.

The concept of silent meditation gained popularity in Western countries such as the US in the late 20th century, leading to the foundation of a number of silent retreat centers. Some of these centers are affiliated with a particular religious discipline, such as Buddhism, Hinduism, or Christianity, while others are non-denominational. Certain centers offer periods of silence combined with other, non-silent activities, such as yoga, while others are totally devoted to silence. Retreats can vary in length from a few days to a few months.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
M.C. Huguelet
By M.C. Huguelet
Cate Huguelet, a Chicago-based freelance writer with a passion for storytelling, crafts engaging content for a wide range of publications, including The Health Board. With degrees in Writing and English, she brings a unique perspective and a commitment to clean, precise copy that resonates with readers. Her ability to understand and connect with audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.

Related Articles

Discussion Comments
By burcinc — On Aug 16, 2014

@bluedolphin-- Have you thought about joining a silent meditation retreat?

I used to have a lot of trouble focusing during silent meditation just like you. I overcame this issue at a retreat. We had several hours allotted in the morning and in the afternoon for silent meditation. I couldn't adapt initially, but after a few days, I was able to do it and it was absolutely blissful. When you are at a place away from work and family and you have no other choice but to sit there quietly and meditate, it's a lot easier to achieve it.

By donasmrs — On Aug 16, 2014

@bluedolphin-- Silent meditation can be difficult when starting out but I do believe that it's the best type of meditation.

We all had trouble focusing and pushing out thoughts when we first began. Our lives are so hectic and stressful that we are used to thinking about something all the time. We don't get much time for ourselves. So the idea of just sitting downs silently, not doing anything, not speaking or thinking can be very strange for a beginner. It's normal to battle with those unending random thoughts while trying to meditate.

This is something you can overcome though. You just need to be persistent and patient. Try it every day. When you notice those thoughts, start over and try again. Eventually, it will get easier and easier. And once you've succeeded in silent meditation once, you will see that it is much more relaxing and beneficial than anything else. I think that music and mantras are similar to those thoughts that we experience. The goal should be to keep the mind as silent as possible, which, in my opinion, is difficult when there is a lot of noise.

By bluedolphin — On Aug 15, 2014

I find it very difficult to do silent meditation. Whenever I try it, some thought or the other occurs and I start thinking about random things. I just can't keep my mind still. Meditating with music is easier for me because the music keeps my mind engaged so that those random thoughts don't occur. I also find it easier to relax with music.

M.C. Huguelet
M.C. Huguelet
Cate Huguelet, a Chicago-based freelance writer with a passion for storytelling, crafts engaging content for a wide...
Learn more
The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.