We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.

Advertiser Disclosure

Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.

How We Make Money

We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently from our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What is the Best Chemotherapy Diet?

Sara Schmidt
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
Our promise to you
The Health Board is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At The Health Board, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

A chemotherapy diet consisting of plenty of liquids and healthful foods can help increase health during chemotherapy. People undergoing chemo treatments need plenty of protein and calories for energy. Maintaining proper food handling techniques, temperatures, and other safety measures are important parts of a chemotherapy diet as well.

High-protein foods are generally recommended for chemotherapy patients. These include nuts, beans, and eggs. Some patients may be able to eat dairy foods to increase their protein intake as well. Fresh fruits and vegetables that are high in antioxidants and easy to eat, such as berries and sweet potatoes, can be helpful to eat throughout chemo treatments.

While eating a chemotherapy diet, the how is just as important as the what. The best chemotherapy diet also takes how much food, when food is consumed, and other factors into account. Since patients often experience nausea, eating should be done at regular intervals with small, healthful meals that can be easily digested. Juicing fresh fruits and vegetables can be helpful for chemotherapy patients.

To ensure proper nutrition during chemotherapy, food should always be well-heated and thoroughly cooked to avoid any possible contamination. Proper cleaning techniques are important for the same reason. Foods that have passed their expiration dates, show signs of spoilage, or are otherwise questionable should not be consumed by people undergoing chemotherapy. Hands should always be washed before handling, preparing, and eating food as well.

Good chemotherapy diet plans should also take into account foods to avoid during treatment. Foods that are hot or spicy should not be consumed while undergoing chemo, as they can aggravate patients, make them ill, or cause irritation to sores that may have developed during treatment. Foods that are high in fats, sugars, and salt should also be avoided, as every calorie counts. Cancer patients need to make sure that the foods that they eat are not empty, but full of nutrients to ensure optimal healing.

Since meat can trigger nausea in many chemotherapy patients, it is usually recommended to abstain from eating meat during chemo. If patients are having trouble keeping all foods down, clear liquids can be gradually introduced until the body accepts them. These may include popsicles, broth, tea, gelatin, and fruit ice. Providing these items instead of water can be helpful in providing the body with at least some needed calories. Some physicians may recommend calorie boosters to be added to drinks or meals as well.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Sara Schmidt
By Sara Schmidt , Writer
With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for The Health Board, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.

Discussion Comments

By bythewell — On Mar 08, 2012

@Iluviaporos - My grandmother had to follow chemotherapy diet restrictions and she had a lot of problems with it as well. We found that she liked eating salmon all right though, and that was what we mostly fed her. She'd also eat thing like blueberries and dry crackers.

It was pretty awful, as she'd always been quite a husky lady, but she started getting quite thin. Eventually though, once it was over, her appetite got back to normal and she even tried to keep her weight down on purpose (not to the same extent of course) trying to see the silver lining in what she'd been through.

By lluviaporos — On Mar 07, 2012

Honestly when my aunt was undergoing chemotherapy it was so difficult to get her to keep anything down.

One of the things that seemed to do OK was miso soup, which is also quite healthy although it can have a lot of salt in it. Check with your doctor of course, but that helped her a lot.

Mostly though, she found it really difficult to eat and it seemed like a big chore.

We did our best to make tiny, tempting treats within the restrictions of the diet for chemotherapy she was given, but there wasn't a heck of a lot of leeway.

Sara Schmidt

Sara Schmidt

Writer

With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for The Health Board, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.
The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.