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What Is the Tunnel Effect?

The Tunnel Effect, a quantum phenomenon, allows particles to pass through barriers seemingly impenetrable by classical physics. It's as if a ball, rolling towards a hill, suddenly appears on the other side without climbing over. This principle is pivotal in technologies like MRI machines and quantum computing. Intrigued? Discover how this effect powers devices in your daily life.
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

The tunnel effect is a perceptual phenomenon where the brain will assume that an object is persistent when it disappears beyond an occlusion and then reappears. For example, if a person sees a horse trot behind a barn and a horse come out on the other side, she will assume it is the same horse, as long as the trajectory of the animal makes sense. While this might seem obvious, it actually involves some complicated cognitive maneuvering and plays an important role in the visual processing of moving objects.

Researchers who study the tunnel effect note that if a subject sees a moving object and it becomes occluded by an obstacle, the subject will predict where and when the object will reappear. The brain relies on the trajectory and speed of the object before it vanishes to calculate this information, although it tends to underestimate travel time through the “tunnel,” the time when it is invisible because of the occlusion.

Hallucinogenic drugs may cause tunnel vision.
Hallucinogenic drugs may cause tunnel vision.

Through the tunnel effect, the brain will perceive a persistent object moving through the same space and time, even if it disappears and reappears. Without this perceptual phenomenon, if something disappeared behind another object and reappeared, the brain might think it was a different object. Cognitively, the brain could be puzzled about what happened to the first object, and also unsure about the origins of the “new” object. A version of this can be seen in playing peek-a-boo with very young infants, who are still developing cognition and perception and may not at first understand what happens when a parent manipulates an object in and out of view.

People who notice changes in vision should seek the advice of an eye care professional.
People who notice changes in vision should seek the advice of an eye care professional.

The tunnel effect can also involve a moving occlusion and a stationary object. A person standing on a street corner, for example, might notice a news stand on the opposite corner. When a car goes by and occludes the news stand, the brain assumes it will reappear after the car passes, and that it will be the same news stand. Interestingly, in studies on how the tunnel effect works, researchers have shown that tricks like changing the color or size of the object do not fool the brain, and it still reads the object as persistent, rather than thinking it is new.

Tunnel vision may occur as a result of extreme stress.
Tunnel vision may occur as a result of extreme stress.

Human perception is complex. Some perceptual phenomena are hardwired and start to manifest at a very young age, while others develop during the infancy stage and start to mature. Providing children with a rich environment is critical for the facilitation of cognitive development. Without stimuli, children will miss out on chances to develop important wiring in their brains, and they may never catch up.

Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a TheHealthBoard researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Learn more...
Mary McMahon
Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a TheHealthBoard researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Learn more...

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    • Hallucinogenic drugs may cause tunnel vision.
      By: Monkey Business
      Hallucinogenic drugs may cause tunnel vision.
    • People who notice changes in vision should seek the advice of an eye care professional.
      By: fred goldstein
      People who notice changes in vision should seek the advice of an eye care professional.
    • Tunnel vision may occur as a result of extreme stress.
      By: Laurin Rinder
      Tunnel vision may occur as a result of extreme stress.