We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What is the Vomer?

Sara Schmidt
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
Our promise to you
The Health Board is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At The Health Board, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

The vomer bone is a rigid, triangular organ in the skull of most vertebrates. Part of the nasal septum, the bone is one of the singular facial bones that exists without a corresponding bone. Long, thin, and flat, it separates the nasal passages. It is also considered responsible for perceiving certain pheromones.

Lying dorsal to the hard palate, the vomer bone defines the features of the face with several other bones. These include the sphenoid, left and right palatine bones, ethmoid, and left and right maxillary bones. The ethmoid bone itself fits into the groove of the vomer. Many animals, cats in particular, have a well-defined vomer that is easily visible.

Two flat surfaces and six borders makeup the largely quadrilateral vomer. Both surfaces of the bone have a nasopalatine groove. This groove runs downward and forward in an oblique slant. The nerves and vessels of the nasal passages are contained in these areas.

A deep furrow marks the superior border, the thickest of the four. The posterior border is concave, thick above and thin below; the inferior border helps to form the crest. The longest border of the bone, the anterior border, slopes both downward and forward. Its upper part is joined with the plate of the ethmoid bone, while the lower part grooves to accommodate the nose's septal cartilage.

Mammals tend to have narrow vomers that exist as single, vertical bones that tend to bend to one side. Bony fish have flattened pairs of the bone that help to create the anterior part of fish mouths. Many species have teeth on their vomers to supplement the teeth of the jaws. Some extinct species had larger vomer teeth than jaw teeth.

Birds typically have small vomers located behind their inner nostrils. These form the upper back part of the beak. Reptiles and amphibians have narrower vomers to accommodate their larger nostrils. Their vomers also usually extend back into the jaw.

Prior to 1975, children with clef palate were sometimes treated with vomer flap surgery. This involved using vomers to reconstruct the palate and cover the cleft itself. Various other surgical methods, including the Millard procedure, have replaced this procedure.

Vomer is Latin for "ploughshare." The bone was named as such because it resembles the cutting component of the plow. Some claim that the bone can be moved by alternately hitting the roof of the mouth with the tongue while pressing the fingers between the eyebrows. No scientific data has been able to prove this theory.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Sara Schmidt
By Sara Schmidt
With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for The Health Board, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.

Related Articles

Discussion Comments
Sara Schmidt
Sara Schmidt
With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for The Health Board, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.
The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.