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How Effective Is Ciprofloxacin for Kidney Infection?

By Rebecca Mecomber
Updated: Mar 03, 2024
References

Ciprofloxacin, sometimes called "cipro" for short, is an antibiotic drug used to treat various bacterial infections. Depending on the type of bacteria present in the urinary tract and kidneys, ciprofloxacin may or may not be effective. A medical practitioner must first determine the type of bacteria causing the infection, and prescribe the correct antibiotic to treat it. Ciprofloxacin for kidney infection is most effective for acute cystitis and pyelonephritis resulting from the Escherichia coli bacterium.

In some cases, the risks associated with ciprofloxacin for kidney infection may outweigh its effectiveness. Sensitive patients may exhibit the mild to more severe side effects of ciprofloxacin, such as vomiting, stomach pain, severe diarrhea, hives, seizures, hallucinations and shaking. Ciprofloxacin may cause bone and joint problems and permanent musculosketal damage in children.

Medical practitioners also warn of ciprofloxacin drug interactions. Some anticoagulants, antipsychotics, antidepressants and heartbeat regulation medications may cause severe reactions and inhibit the effectiveness of the antibiotic or reduce the effectiveness of the other prescribed drugs. Antacids or supplements containing aluminum, calcium or magnesium reduce the effectiveness of ciprofloxacin by preventing the intestinal tract from absorbing the drug.

Usually, a kidney infection results from an foregoing urinary tract infection (UTI). Bacteria enters the urethra and moves into the bladder. Untreated, the bacteria rapidly reproduces in the warm, fertile environment and extends up into the kidneys. The Escherichia coli , or E. coli, bacterium is responsible for 80 to 85 percent of kidney infections.

E. coli bacteria is naturally present in the intestinal tract. Due to the physical proximity of the anus and the urethra, especially in women, E. coli can easily travel into the urinary tract and infect the renal system. In such cases, ciprofloxacin for kidney infection works effectively to disarm bacterial reproduction and reduce inflammation and discomfort.

The drug ciprofloxacin is one of a class of synthetic fluoroquinolones. It works by inhibiting enzyme manufacture in the DNA of bacteria. In addition to prescribing ciprofloxacin for kidney infection, doctors prescribe the drug to treat infections of the lower respiratory tract, skin, sinus cavity, bones, cellulitis and for such diseases as anthrax, enteric or Typhoid fever, and certain sexually-transmitted diseases. Ciprofloxacin is not effective for conditions resulting from physical injuries or structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, such as kidney stones, vesicoureteral reflux or an abnormally short urethra. Ciprofloxacin will treat chronic infections arising from such abnormalities, but cannot cure the underlying physical cause.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
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Discussion Comments
By Talentryto — On Mar 12, 2014

You are right about Cipro side effects Rundocuri. I have had some bad experiences taking it, so I try to treat the first signs of any urinary tract infections with pure cranberry juice first. Of course, no one should try this home remedy without being monitored by a doctor.

By Rundocuri — On Mar 11, 2014

Though Ciprofloxacin is commonly prescribed for kidney and other urinary tract infections, you must take it with caution. Since it does have the potential to cause some bad side effects, always tell your doctor immediately if you experience any issues while taking it. Also, take it exactly as prescribed.

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