We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What are the Common Causes of Cheek Swelling?

A. Pasbjerg
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
Our promise to you
The Health Board is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At The Health Board, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Cheek swelling can be the result of a variety of different issues. It can be a symptom of an underlying dental issue that is causing inflammation in the mouth. Allergic reactions and infections are commonly to blame, as well as inflammation of the lymph nodes located in and around the cheeks. A cheek may swell if it is damaged by some type of blunt force trauma. Growths such as tumors or cysts can also cause cheek swelling.

Dental issues affecting the teeth or gums often lead to cheek swelling. Teeth can become abscessed; a pus-filled cavity may form in the gum or bone at the base of the tooth, leading to pain and swelling in all of the nearby tissues including the cheek. Wisdom teeth that come in crooked or crowd other teeth, or become impacted, may also lead to enlarged, distended cheeks.

Another common cause of cheek swelling is an allergic reaction. If a person is exposed to an allergen, particularly if it comes in contact with his or her face, then the cheeks may swell in response. For example, someone who develops an allergy to his or her laundry detergent may have a reaction after sleeping on a pillowcase washed with it.

Infection is another common trigger of cheek swelling. Bacteria may get into small nicks or cuts inside the cheeks, causing them to form canker sores that become inflamed, painful, and swollen. Cheek swelling can be a symptom of certain types of disease such as mumps. A variety of infections can also lead to lymphadenopathy, or enlargement of the lymph nodes, which occurs when bacteria from the body builds up there; if the affected nodes are located in the cheeks, then they may in turn become swollen.

An injury to the face is frequently to blame for cheek swelling. Bumping the cheek into something hard, being hit, or falling and hitting the face are all possible ways to cause bruising and puffiness in the tissues of the cheek. If the trauma also causes the inside of the cheek to be cut by the teeth, the laceration may add to the irritation and inflammation of the area.

Sometimes swelling can be the result of growths in the cheek tissue. Sebaceous cysts may form in the skin on the cheeks, making the surrounding area bulge as they fill with sebum. Cancerous tumors that arise in the cheeks can also lead to uncomfortable swelling.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
A. Pasbjerg
By A. Pasbjerg
Andrea Pasbjerg, a The Health Board contributor, holds an MBA from West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Her business background helps her to create content that is both informative and practical, providing readers with valuable insights and strategies for success in the business world.
Discussion Comments
By anon928392 — On Jan 28, 2014

In my case I don't feel any pain any time I have something that's not good for me. Sometimes it appears when I am about to have my period. What do I do?

By anon353527 — On Oct 31, 2013

I seem to have a swelling in my cheek, on the right side near my lower teeth. It seemed normal and soft when I palpated it and the other side is normal. The problem is that when I attempt to bite down gently, I seem to be feeling the cheek on my teeth. What can this be?

By Mallory67 — On Jul 04, 2011

@Burtabulous - Clove oil is also a really good remedy for a swollen tooth.

It's also important not to use a straw and to eat only soft foods. In addition, you should avoid both hot and cold foods/ beverages and just stick with warm items.

By burtabulous — On Jul 03, 2011

From personal experience, wisdom teeth cheek swelling can be extremely painful and debilitating. If you are experiencing this and are looking for temporary remedies to relieve the pain until you can see a dentist, you might want to consider trying some of the following options:

-Placing a wet teabag on the wisdom tooth area

-gargling warm salt water several times per day

-rinsing your mouth with peroxide (but be careful not to ingest)

-applying heat packs and ice packs to the side of your face

A. Pasbjerg
A. Pasbjerg
Andrea Pasbjerg, a The Health Board contributor, holds an MBA from West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Her business background helps her to create content that is both informative and practical, providing readers with valuable insights and strategies for success in the business world.
The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.