We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What Are the Pros and Cons of Umbilical Hernia Surgery?

Autumn Rivers
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
Our promise to you
The Health Board is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At The Health Board, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

An umbilical hernia describes a small piece of tissue inside the abdominal cavity that pushes against the lining, poking out through the navel. This issue usually disappears on its own in children, but many adults who are affected by an umbilical hernia might choose to undergo surgery because the hernia, in older patients, rarely goes away without treatment. Umbilical hernia surgery can be advantageous because it gets rid of the pain, and it helps patients prevent complications. Just like any type of surgery, though, there are some risks, which is why some patients decide to skip any treatment if the hernia is not painful. Additionally, there is a recovery period of at least two weeks, requiring patients to take time off work or school for treatment.

Most doctors recommend umbilical hernia surgery only to patients who are in pain, especially if the hernia does not appear to be healing on its own. In such cases, treatment can be a relief, because it can be uncomfortable to wait for years in the hopes that a painful hernia will heal by itself. Some hernias are large enough to be visible to other people, which can be embarrassing and difficult to explain, in which case surgery might be an attractive option. In addition, some hernias grow larger over time and might even become strangulated, which means that the protruding tissue gets stuck bulging out. The result is often tissue death, because the blood flow is stopped entirely, in which case umbilical hernia surgery is necessary.

Treating an umbilical hernia with surgery is usually advised only when necessary, because there are some risks involved, as with any surgery. Some patients might have an allergic reaction to the anesthesia that is offered to numb the area before treatment. Common examples of such reactions include heart problems or trouble breathing during surgery. Additionally, there is the possibility that the physician will accidentally puncture the large intestine, which can be more worrisome than the umbilical hernia itself. Of course, excess bleeding and infection are risks that are possible during surgical operations, and umbilical hernia surgery is no exception.

Recovering from umbilical hernia surgery often takes two to four weeks, which means that work, school and any regular activities likely will be interrupted. During this time, patients need to protect the incision, especially when coughing, sneezing or straining. It can be difficult to monitor young patients during the recovery period, which is another reason many doctors are hesitant to perform this surgery on children — aside from the fact that most children's hernias heal on their own. Patients are advised to weigh all of the pros and cons before deciding to get surgery for an umbilical hernia.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Autumn Rivers
By Autumn Rivers
Autumn Rivers, a talented writer for The Health Board, holds a B.A. in Journalism from Arizona State University. Her background in journalism helps her create well-researched and engaging content, providing readers with valuable insights and information on a variety of subjects.
Discussion Comments
By anon1006504 — On Mar 24, 2022

My name is Mary and I'm 75. I've had this hernia for about 5-6 years. Just the other evening, I had a really bad episode. I had so much pain and dry heaves at different times in the night. My pulmonary doctor said I cannot go under anymore because of my C.O.P.D., with only 30% of my lungs left. But I was reading some people can put the hernia back in its place and no more pain. Is this true? Should I ask a doctor if he could show and teach me how to do this?

Autumn Rivers
Autumn Rivers
Autumn Rivers, a talented writer for The Health Board, holds a B.A. in Journalism from Arizona State University. Her background in journalism helps her create well-researched and engaging content, providing readers with valuable insights and information on a variety of subjects.
The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.