We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What are the Symptoms of Memory Loss in Children?

Sara Schmidt
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
Our promise to you
The Health Board is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At The Health Board, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Forgetfulness, cognitive impairment, and general impaired memory are the most common symptoms of memory loss in children. Depending on the cause, a child may also experience physical symptoms, such as nausea or fatigue, as well as emotional symptoms, such as anxiety.

Children who experience memory loss often suffer from frequent confusion. They may not be able to retain information at an age-appropriate level, and can show developmental delays. In extreme cases, these children may also experience temporary or permanent amnesia.

Depression and anxiety often occur simultaneously with memory loss in children, and these two issues can be symptoms as well as causes of the problem. Children may have an inability to concentrate, or to concentrate for long periods of time, and may be tired and fatigued. Some children who suffer from memory loss also exhibit general or extreme irritability. They may also have digestive problems, including a loss of appetite, diarrhea and incontinence.

Some children with memory problems become sensitive to noise or light. Those who suffer from some type of head trauma, whether due to an accident or abuse, may stop being interested in the types of things they would usually enjoy, such as games, toys, or activities. Many children with head injuries who lose their memory also lose their sense of balance and may have trouble walking.

Memory loss can also occur after a child experiences a period of unconsciousness or concussion. This symptom may be accompanied by vomiting or nausea, slurred speech, and dizziness. Kids who have memory loss as a result of a concussion may also complain of headaches and ringing in the ears.

Seizures can be a symptom or a cause of memory loss in children. If some form of diabetes is the reason for the memory problem, children may drink and urinate more frequently, and they can have an increased appetite. They may become obese or lose weight and can develop blurry vision. Some children who have memory loss in conjunction with diabetes may also seem to be in poor health generally, get more infections, and may develop patches of soft, dark skin known as acanthosis nigricans.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Sara Schmidt
By Sara Schmidt
With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for The Health Board, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.
Discussion Comments
By pleonasm — On Aug 05, 2011

@indigomoth - I think that is good advice, but people also have to remember to trust their gut instinct when it comes to their child.

If you think something is wrong, you should not take any chances. Just bring them into the doctor.

Unfortunately, often childhood illness moves swiftly, and a symptom like memory loss is quite a dangerous one.

Don't overreact to your kids if they are just being kids, but always trust your gut. If it says something is wrong, don't be embarrassed about insisting it be seen to.

By indigomoth — On Aug 05, 2011

You have to be very careful if you suspect this in your child. Often kids will try to compensate for something they don't understand, so you might not realize what is going on right away.

But, at the same time, if you are worried you can confuse them further. Kids aren't always articulate, but they can pick up on cues really easily. If you start giving them more attention because you're worried, they might play up to it.

Or, if you frighten them, they might try to avoid the behavior that seemed to set you off.

Either way, you should try to be as calm and consistent as you can, until you can figure out what is going on.

Sara Schmidt
Sara Schmidt
With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for The Health Board, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.
The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.