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What is a Blood Tonic?

Allison Boelcke
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
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A tonic is a term that generally refers to a liquid or supplement used for medicinal purposes to promote general well-being, rather than just being administered during an illness. A blood tonic is a supplement that may be consumed as a means to produce more blood cells within the body. It is typically recommended in Chinese medicine.

One of the central principles of Chinese medicine is qi, the concept that the body is composed of different energy levels that must be perfectly balanced. Illness is thought to be caused by imbalances in qi. The role of blood is similar to qi and also plays an important role in Chinese medicine. Many health conditions are thought to be the result of a lack of blood production. Traditional Chinese medicine states that this lack of blood production is due to a decrease in qi. A tonic may be recommended in order to stimulate increased blood production and qi.

One of the main uses of blood tonic is for those with anemia. Anemia is a condition in which the blood does not have enough red blood cells, which are primarily responsible for distributing oxygen throughout the body. This decrease in oxygen distribution can leave an anemic person feeling weak and fatigued. Tonics may also be recommended for women who are menstruating or may simply be used to promote general well-being. One may also be promoted as being an anti-aging skin product to prevent wrinkles, as well as to make hair shinier.

The exact recipe for such tonics can vary widely in Chinese medicine. A homemade version will typically consist of a mixture of medicinal herbs steeped in hot water with other flavorings for several hours until the water is flavored. After steeping, the solid pieces are discarded and only the broth is consumed. A common homemade version of the tonic consists of medicinal roots, such as ginseng, ginger, and a type of protein, such as a chicken, beef, lamb, eggs, or fish.

Blood tonics are also often packaged and sold commercially as a syrup or tea. Small spoonfuls of commercial syrups are generally recommended orally twice a day for anemic, menstrual women, or those who need to improve their blood circulation. The dried roots and other ingredients that are used to make the tonic may also be sold loose on their own, and then added to hot water to make a tea.

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Allison Boelcke
By Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By bluespirit — On Jul 13, 2011

@runner 101 - No, there is not actual blood in the blood tonic!

There are blood tonics that are branded that are known for helping with aging and therefore they are supposed to help with wrinkles. But I would suggest going to see a Chinese herbalist or just plain herbalist and asking them to find what best suits you.

It is a different type of medicine than westerners are used to, but it is very common in other parts of the world.

By runner101 — On Jul 12, 2011

I have never heard of this, most likely from always having lived in the United States and therefore, mostly having learned only western medicine.

I am just starting to get those wrinkles under my eyes, and I am only 28! That's probably a normal age to begin getting wrinkles, but I am not happy about it.

I just want to be sure of one thing - so there is no actual blood in the tonic?

Is there a certain blood tonic recipe for wrinkles?

Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
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