We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What is Charcot Foot?

Marjorie McAtee
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
Our promise to you
The Health Board is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At The Health Board, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Charcot foot is a debilitating foot condition often associated with disorders of neuropathy. Charcot foot typically occurs when the bones of the foot weaken, leading to a collapse of the foot's arch. The sole of a foot affected by this condition often takes on a convex appearance. It can be difficult and painful for sufferers to walk on a foot affected by this condition. Diabetics are considered more likely than others to develop Charcot foot, since diabetes can lead to nerve damage in the extremities, often known as peripheral neuropathy. Treatment is generally most effective when the disease is diagnosed early, and usually involves a combination of rest, bracing, special footwear, and surgery.

People who suffer from neuropathy, or nerve damage, in the feet are generally most vulnerable to Charcot foot. Nerve damage in the feet can contribute to weakening of the bones and joints in the foot. The bones and joints in the foot can eventually begin to collapse, causing the sole of the foot to bulge outward.

Repetitive stress, such as that which occurs during ordinary walking, can often contribute to the collapse of bones and joints in a foot affected by this condition. Sudden trauma, such as dropping a heavy object on the foot, can often cause the arch to collapse suddenly. Persons suffering from nerve damage in the feet often experience a reduced ability to feel hot, cold, or pain in the feet, and may continue about their daily activities without realizing that they have suffered serious foot injury.

Symptoms of this condition usually include inflammation and unusual warmth in the affected foot. Some people may be able to feel pain or discomfort in the affected foot.

Most physicians believe that, the earlier Charcot foot is diagnosed, the easier it is to treat. The patient may need to keep weight off of the foot for several months, since the softened bones of a Charcot foot can take a long time to heal. Keeping weight off of the foot often helps prevent a worsening of the condition. The patient may need crutches or a wheelchair to get around, and a cast or orthopedic brace may be applied to the injured foot. In severe and advanced cases, surgery may be necessary to repair the damaged bones of the foot.

Patients often need to wear customized footwear and make lifestyle adjustments to prevent the recurrence of Charcot foot. Time spent on the feet may need to be limited, to avoid placing too much strain on the weakened bones and joints of the feet. Most physicians will recommend customized footwear for both feet, since the other foot may be equally vulnerable to damage.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Marjorie McAtee
By Marjorie McAtee
Marjorie McAtee, a talented writer and editor with over 15 years of experience, brings her diverse background and education to everything she writes. With degrees in relevant fields, she crafts compelling content that informs, engages, and inspires readers across various platforms. Her ability to understand and connect with audiences makes her a skilled member of any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
Marjorie McAtee
Marjorie McAtee
Marjorie McAtee, a talented writer and editor with over 15 years of experience, brings her diverse background and education to everything she writes. With degrees in relevant fields, she crafts compelling content that informs, engages, and inspires readers across various platforms. Her ability to understand and connect with audiences makes her a skilled member of any content creation team.
The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.