We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What Is Kimura Disease?

Alex Tree
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
Our promise to you
The Health Board is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At The Health Board, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Kimura disease is a relatively harmless health condition that results in the afflicted person developing lumps on the head or neck. It is a rare disease that mostly affects Asian men. The cause of Kimura disease is unknown, and research is hindered by its rarity. Diagnosing the disease includes a visual inspection of the person’s body, because the lumps are usually quite noticeable. Health professionals do not agree on the best treatment, but the lumps are occasionally removed surgically.

The disease was first reported in China in the late 1930s, but was not given its current name until nearly 1950. People suffering from Kimura disease are usually quite young, anywhere from eight to 30 years old. The majority of reported cases have occurred in Asian males, but it is not limited to the Asian race. The disease is virtually unknown in North America and the United Kingdom, but researchers are not certain why.

As of 2011, the cause of Kimura disease is unknown and only theories exist as to why people are afflicted by it. Some theories involve an allergic reaction, virus, or parasite, resulting in an autoimmune reaction. All theories, including those, however, are still unsubstantiated, and many of them are little more than guesses. Many other theories regarding the cause of the disease exist but are complicated for the layman. Research is ongoing, and there may eventually be a definite cause.

A diagnosis can be made by taking a sample of the lump. In addition, health professionals can usually narrow down a patient’s problem by simply looking at the lump. Sometimes other diseases, both harmless and potentially fatal, mimic the disease. It is important for health professionals to be sure of a diagnosis before beginning treatment, because the lump could be cancer or a health problem that would go away on its own. Lumps located on body parts other than the head or neck are usually not this disease.

The lesions caused by Kimura disease are not always treated, but when they are, it is typically for cosmetic reasons. Vitamin supplements, steroids, and radiation are all often used in the treatment of Kimura disease. What treatments are used depends on the severity of the growths caused by the disease and how much they bother the person afflicted by them. For example, radiation is not typically used to treat this condition unless a person’s quality of life is affected significantly enough to use such a dangerous treatment option.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Alex Tree
By Alex Tree
Andrew McDowell is a talented writer and The Health Board contributor. His unique perspective and ability to communicate complex ideas in an accessible manner make him a valuable asset to the team, as he crafts content that both informs and engages readers.
Discussion Comments
By anon954279 — On May 31, 2014

Also the statement that it mostly affects Asian men is not true. It seems that way because the vast majority of people on the planet are Asian. But no, it's been proven untrue.

By anon954278 — On May 31, 2014

I have Kimura's disease and find the statement "relatively harmless" quite offensive. It's life altering, disfiguring and for most of us, causes kidney failure. I find it the worst thing that's ever happened to me as does everyone else I know with it and I know more people with it than anyone else in the world does. (The huge number of five people).

Alex Tree
Alex Tree
Andrew McDowell is a talented writer and The Health Board contributor. His unique perspective and ability to communicate complex ideas in an accessible manner make him a valuable asset to the team, as he crafts content that both informs and engages readers.
The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.