We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

How does Eating Protein Affect my Body?

Marjorie McAtee
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
Our promise to you
The Health Board is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At The Health Board, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Eating protein is essential to human health because protein is one of the key human nutrients, along with fat and carbohydrates. The body uses protein to build cells, regulate the production of enzymes and hormones, maintain the fluid balance between cells, and create energy. Eating protein can help keep the body strong and can regulate important metabolic functions. Eating too much protein, however, may cause health problems.

Protein is made up of the 20 essential amino acids that form the molecular building blocks of the human body. The tissues of the human body are generally subject to a continuous process of depletion and renewal. The body typically uses protein to build and renew every type of cell, including those that make up bones, muscles, organs, and connective tissues.

Eating protein can help the human body manufacture essential enzymes and hormones. Hormones such as insulin, which regulates blood glucose levels, are generally made up of the essential amino acids found in protein. Enzymes are molecules of protein that allow biological chemical reactions to occur. Enzymes act as chemical catalysts to the reactions that occur within the body during digestion and other metabolic processes. Eating protein helps keep enzyme and hormone levels normal to prevent metabolic and endocrine disorders.

Protein also helps the human body maintain an appropriate fluid balance in and between cells. Blood protein molecules called albumins and globulins help create the pressure that typically regulates the flow of blood into and out of capillary regions, where blood pressure is often lower.

The human body generally uses carbohydrates and fats for energy, rather than protein. The human body typically uses protein for energy only if dietary sources of fats and carbohydrates are low. When the body uses protein for energy, tissue maintenance and other crucial bodily functions usually suffer. That's why a diet high in protein but low in carbohydrates and fat can be dangerous.

The human body can usually store excess carbohydrates and fat for later use, but it can't store protein. The human body typically breaks protein down into its component parts, the essential amino acids. The human body usually strips nitrogen from any excess amino acids in the blood. This nitrogen can build up in the kidneys and liver, damaging these organs and contributing to liver and kidney disease. Eating protein in excessive amounts may also contribute to osteoporosis, heart disease, cancer, and kidney stones.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Marjorie McAtee
By Marjorie McAtee
Marjorie McAtee, a talented writer and editor with over 15 years of experience, brings her diverse background and education to everything she writes. With degrees in relevant fields, she crafts compelling content that informs, engages, and inspires readers across various platforms. Her ability to understand and connect with audiences makes her a skilled member of any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By Heavanet — On Feb 07, 2014

Good post for the vegetarians Rundocuri. These types of proteins also have the same positive impact on the body as the meat-based proteins offer.

By Rundocuri — On Feb 01, 2014

If you don't like meat or are a vegetarian, there are still many good proteins to eat to get your daily recommended amounts in your diet. Tofu, beans, eggs, dairy products, and various pre-packaged shakes are good sources of protein. Also, eating carbs with protein will help you stay strong and energized.

Marjorie McAtee
Marjorie McAtee
Marjorie McAtee, a talented writer and editor with over 15 years of experience, brings her diverse background and education to everything she writes. With degrees in relevant fields, she crafts compelling content that informs, engages, and inspires readers across various platforms. Her ability to understand and connect with audiences makes her a skilled member of any content creation team.
The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

The Health Board, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.