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What are the Causes of Black Tarry Stools?

Allison Boelcke
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
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Black tarry stools, technically known as melena, is a condition in which bowel movements have a deeper color and stickier texture than normal bowel movements. The brown color of healthy bowel movements is due to bile, a greenish yellow substance made in the liver that travels into the intestines during the digestion process and turns solid waste brown. If there is any bleeding in the intestines, the bile may react with it and produce a black color with a tacky texture. The intestinal bleeding that leads to abnormally dark stool can be caused by a variety of conditions that affect areas of the digestive tract.

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is comprised of two portions: the upper GI tract and the lower GI tract. The upper GI tract is made up of the stomach, esophagus, and top of the small intestine, while the lower GI tract includes the bottom of the intestines, rectum, and anus. When any bleeding occurs in the upper GI tract, it mixes with the body’s digestive chemicals and turns black. Lower GI tract bleeding will generally result in red stool because the blood isn’t exposed to digestive juices.

One of the most common causes of upper GI tract bleeding, which can lead to black tarry stools, is a stomach ulcer, a condition in which sores or tears form in the tissue lining of the stomach as a result of bacteria, weakened immune system, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Ulcers can sometimes start to bleed lightly if the sores spread into the blood vessels of the stomach lining. Although the bleeding is typically not heavy enough to be an immediate danger, it can cause severe pain in the region, especially after eating. It is often treated with medications that limit the amount of acids in the digestive juices to prevent future damage to the stomach lining.

Black tarry stools can also be due to conditions that affect the blood vessels inside the upper GI tract. If a person is born with vascular malformation, his or her blood vessels may not be formed correctly and cannot properly control blood flow. Vascular malformation may make a person more likely to have light bleeding in the upper GI tract. Common blood vessel abnormalities may include overly widened vessels that give too much blood at once, or tightened vessels that prevent blood from traveling quickly enough.

In less common instances, black tarry stools can actually be the result of a condition that is not blood-related. Eating foods with dark colors, such as blueberries and black licorice, can cause bowel movements to have a black appearance. Supplements or medications that contain metallic elements like bismuth or iron can also result in dark stools.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Allison Boelcke
By Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By Terrificli — On Aug 21, 2014

@Vinzenzo -- Good advice, but people tend to ignore black, sticky stools because they figure those will clear up in time. That's not always the case, of course, so checking those out is important.

Here is something else to consider. If you have an upset stomach and that is leading to black stools, taking some anti acids or stomach relief medicines can actually make that condition worse. In other words, self diagnosis and treatment is rarely the best option.

By Vincenzo — On Aug 20, 2014

Want some advice? If black, sticky stools linger for more than a few days, get to the doctor and get some help. Those could be the result of ulcers (not a great condition) to ulcerative colitis (a very dangerous condition). Losing that blood could also mean you are anemic, so checking on that is also important.

Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
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