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What are the Different Types of Benign Breast Lumps?

Allison Boelcke
By
Updated Mar 03, 2024
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Benign breast lumps are non-cancerous lumps caused by changes in breast tissue. They can occur in one or both breasts and can be moved slightly when pressed. Most benign lumps do not require treatment and will subside on their own. Benign breast lumps can be caused by natural breast tissue changes, hormonal levels, breast injuries, or breast infections.

The most common type of benign breast lumps are fibroadenomas. These lumps occur when the breast tissue has too many milk-production glands, referred to as lobules. Fibroadenomas are round, painless lumps that generally appear in women in their twenties and thirties. African American women are the most likely to have fibroadenomas.

Intraductal papillomas are small growths in the lining of the milk ducts. They can cause breast lumps under the nipple and may result in bleeding or discharge from the nipple. Intraductal papillomas do not need to be treated unless they become painful. They tend to occur most often in middle-aged women.

During menstrual cycles, some women may experience fibrocystic changes in the breasts that result in hard lumps. Fibrocystic breast changes are caused by hormone fluctuations during the menstrual cycle. Breasts may become harder and lumpier to the touch before the beginning of menstrual bleeding. Fibrocystic breast changes are the most common in women their forties, but become less likely once women enter menopause.

Another type of benign breast lump that can occur during the menstrual cycle are simple cysts, small sacs that contain fluid and tend to vary in size. Depending on hormonal changes, a woman can have multiple simple cysts at once. Simple cysts can be tender or painful during the menstrual cycle but will disappear once hormone levels return to normal.

Traumatic fat necrosis is a condition in which benign breast lumps are caused by trauma or sudden injury to the breast. The trauma results in fat in the breast developing into hard lumps. Lumps caused by traumatic fat necrosis are generally painless and go away on their own without treatment.

Infections in the breast can result in benign breast lumps. A common breast infection is mastitis, a condition in which the milk ducts become clogged and infected. It is most prevalent in women who breastfeed. Mastitis can cause breast lumps, as well as redness and pain, but can be cured with antibiotics.

Men can experience benign breast lumps as well. Gynecomastia is a condition in which males experience abnormal breast enlargement, as well as tenderness and lumps underneath the nipples. It can be caused by hormonal imbalances or medications containing steroids or estrogen. Gynecomastia may disappear on its own or can be surgically treated.

The Health Board is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Allison Boelcke
By Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
Discussion Comments
By Wisedly33 — On Sep 15, 2014

I had a friend who was in a bad wreck, and sustained chest trauma. She got some fatty necrosis in one breast. It caused the tissue to become really hard and like gristle or something.

Naturally, it scared her to death, so she went to the doctor, and he insisted on referring her to a surgeon for a lumpectomy -- especially since her grandmother had breast cancer.

The surgeon removed the lumps and saw immediately they were benign, but it sure did give my friend a scare. She was really afraid the breast cancer specter had touched her, too.

By Scrbblchick — On Sep 14, 2014

I have fibrocystic disease in both breasts, and I can tell when I've been drinking too much caffeine because I'll get a pea-sized lump on the top of one breast.

I found it the first time when I was about 25. My mom called her friend, who is a nurse, and she said to watch it for a couple of weeks, and to cut out caffeine. I did and the lump disappeared in a couple of days. Mom's friend said that caffeine can cause a lump, for whatever reason, in a woman who has fibrocystic disease anyway.

These days, if I feel a little lumpy, I cut down on the caffeine and everything is fine in just a day or two. It's odd how that works. I'm just glad it's benign.

Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke
Allison Boelcke, a digital marketing manager and freelance writer, helps businesses create compelling content to connect with their target markets and drive results. With a degree in English, she combines her writing skills with marketing expertise to craft engaging content that gets noticed and leads to website traffic and conversions. Her ability to understand and connect with target audiences makes her a valuable asset to any content creation team.
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