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What is Retinal Vein Thrombosis?

Retinal Vein Thrombosis is a serious eye condition where a blood clot blocks the retinal vein, disrupting vision. It can cause symptoms like blurred vision or sudden sight loss. Understanding its causes, treatments, and prevention is crucial for eye health. Have you considered how this condition might affect you or your loved ones? Join us as we examine its impact on vision.
Deneatra Harmon
Deneatra Harmon

Retinal vein thrombosis, or retinal vein occlusion, causes a blockage of normal blood flow to the eye's retina. Symptoms of this condition may appear subtly but gradually worsen over time. Cardiovascular problems and other risk factors often contribute to the formation of eye thrombosis. Tests for this type of blockage evaluate vision, eye pressure, and any damage to the retina. Treatment methods depend on whether the blockage is partial or complete.

Located in the back of the eye, retina tissue helps to focus on images and light, thereby providing vision. The operation of the retina are similar to a camera lens. The retina must also circulate blood flow freely through an artery and a vein to function properly. Retinal vein thrombosis occurs when that blood circulation throughout the eye becomes blocked because of lack of oxygen. The results lead to a blood clot or hemorrhaging in part of the retina, which in turn affects vision.

Retinal vein thrombosis causes a blockage of normal blood flow to the retina.
Retinal vein thrombosis causes a blockage of normal blood flow to the retina.

Blockage may be present if a person experiences blurred vision or sudden vision loss in one eye. Episodes of blurred or temporary vision loss may last no more than 15 minutes according to medical sources. Retinal vein thrombosis causes no pain, but symptoms can gradually damage the retina and cause permanent loss of sight if not properly treated.

Some people may experience retinal vein occlusion because of the structure of the eyes or as a result of a preexisting medical condition. The veins within an eye may be too narrow, thereby increasing the risk of the blockage. Cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, also raise the risk of developing retinal vein thrombosis in one eye. Blockage in the veins of the body can also coincide with those of the retina to cause thrombosis. In addition to atherosclerosis, other risk factors associated with this condition include diabetes, high blood pressure, and glaucoma.

Veins carry deoxygenated blood to the heart.
Veins carry deoxygenated blood to the heart.

To detect the presence of retinal vein occlusion, a doctor tests for vision and overall eye health. Upon reviewing the relevant medical history, the doctor uses visual acuity and field tests to determine how well the patient sees letters and objects. Comprehensive tests such as slit lamp, retinal photography, intraocular pressure, pupil reflex, and refraction examine the inside of the eye for retinal vein occlusion.

Atherosclerosis, which is the hardening of arteries, is a risk factor for developing retinal vein thrombosis.
Atherosclerosis, which is the hardening of arteries, is a risk factor for developing retinal vein thrombosis.

Treatment options for partial and total retinal vein thrombosis include laser procedures as well as injections. Laser photocoagulation helps to prevent fluid buildup in the area of the retinal vein blockage. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections reportedly treat thrombosis and prevent the development of eye diseases like glaucoma. Methods for treating retinal vein thrombosis do not reverse the blockage, however; they simply prevent new ones from forming and worsening vision. Vision in the eye ultimately returns, but it is rarely 100 percent back to normal.

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    • Retinal vein thrombosis causes a blockage of normal blood flow to the retina.
      By: kocakayaali
      Retinal vein thrombosis causes a blockage of normal blood flow to the retina.
    • Veins carry deoxygenated blood to the heart.
      By: stockshoppe
      Veins carry deoxygenated blood to the heart.
    • Atherosclerosis, which is the hardening of arteries, is a risk factor for developing retinal vein thrombosis.
      By: GraphicCompressor
      Atherosclerosis, which is the hardening of arteries, is a risk factor for developing retinal vein thrombosis.
    • People who experience changes in their vision should consult an ophthalmologist as early as possible.
      By: fred goldstein
      People who experience changes in their vision should consult an ophthalmologist as early as possible.
    • Cardiovascular disease may raise a person's risk of developing retinal vein thrombosis.
      By: oscar williams
      Cardiovascular disease may raise a person's risk of developing retinal vein thrombosis.
    • Retinal vein thrombosis may manifest as blurred vision.
      By: Voyagerix
      Retinal vein thrombosis may manifest as blurred vision.
    • Risk factors associated with retinal vein thrombosis may include high blood pressure.
      By: mangostock
      Risk factors associated with retinal vein thrombosis may include high blood pressure.
    • Symptoms of retinal vein thrombosis may gradually worsen over time.
      By: Hunor Kristo
      Symptoms of retinal vein thrombosis may gradually worsen over time.